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Table 1.

Categories of Food Identity Evident in the Process of Identity Maintenance and Change

Food IdentityMeaning of Food ActivitiesFocus of Participation and EngagementSupporting DataParticipant Pseudonyms
Food lover (n = 18) Love food Spending time and money “I’m a foodie, really; I love food.” (Maisy) Maisy, Bettie, Jack, Sarah, Patricia, Carol, Saul, William, Sharon, Robert, Dorothy, Jill, Jean, Peter, Daphne, Gloria, Mary, Martha 
Lifelong pleasure Cooking together “I’m greedy and I love my breakfast; that’s my reason for getting up.” (Dorothy) 
Important Resisting temptation “We just like growing and cooking things.” (Jill) 
  “Basically, we cook because we’re obsessed.” (Peter) 
Nonfoodie (n = 10) Uninterested in food Spending as little time as possible “I wouldn’t say I’m a foodie at all.” (Linda) Margaret, Wanda, Linda, Fred, Victoria, Eileen, Sue, Nancy, Ethel, Rupert 
Lack of pleasure “I’m no cook. . . . All I do is warm up what somebody else cooked.” (Fred) 
Not important “I’m a lousy cook. I don’t want to cook. Also, I can’t stand . . . the cooker.” (Victoria) 
 “I’d be quite happy not to eat but enjoy life in other ways.” (Rupert) 
Not bothered (n = 11) Less pleasurable Spending as little time as possible “You get that you can’t really be bothered [with cooking].” (Edna) Edna, Ruth, Marjory, Howard, Barbara, Anne, Judith, Helen, Mary, Sally, Phyllis 
Less important “I used to quite enjoy cooking, but I just can’t be bothered these days.” (Marjory) 
Too much effort “[The importance of eating] comes and goes. . . . It depends on my feelings. . . . I enjoyed eating when I was working, so it does go socially, really, but on your own. . . .” (Sally) 
 “[Cooking] used to be [important] when I had a family to cook for. . . . [Now] my daughter moans at me.” (Judith) 
 “Well, I suppose it [food] becomes much more mundane, doesn’t it? It becomes something you know you have to do because you have to eat.” (Barbara) 
Food IdentityMeaning of Food ActivitiesFocus of Participation and EngagementSupporting DataParticipant Pseudonyms
Food lover (n = 18) Love food Spending time and money “I’m a foodie, really; I love food.” (Maisy) Maisy, Bettie, Jack, Sarah, Patricia, Carol, Saul, William, Sharon, Robert, Dorothy, Jill, Jean, Peter, Daphne, Gloria, Mary, Martha 
Lifelong pleasure Cooking together “I’m greedy and I love my breakfast; that’s my reason for getting up.” (Dorothy) 
Important Resisting temptation “We just like growing and cooking things.” (Jill) 
  “Basically, we cook because we’re obsessed.” (Peter) 
Nonfoodie (n = 10) Uninterested in food Spending as little time as possible “I wouldn’t say I’m a foodie at all.” (Linda) Margaret, Wanda, Linda, Fred, Victoria, Eileen, Sue, Nancy, Ethel, Rupert 
Lack of pleasure “I’m no cook. . . . All I do is warm up what somebody else cooked.” (Fred) 
Not important “I’m a lousy cook. I don’t want to cook. Also, I can’t stand . . . the cooker.” (Victoria) 
 “I’d be quite happy not to eat but enjoy life in other ways.” (Rupert) 
Not bothered (n = 11) Less pleasurable Spending as little time as possible “You get that you can’t really be bothered [with cooking].” (Edna) Edna, Ruth, Marjory, Howard, Barbara, Anne, Judith, Helen, Mary, Sally, Phyllis 
Less important “I used to quite enjoy cooking, but I just can’t be bothered these days.” (Marjory) 
Too much effort “[The importance of eating] comes and goes. . . . It depends on my feelings. . . . I enjoyed eating when I was working, so it does go socially, really, but on your own. . . .” (Sally) 
 “[Cooking] used to be [important] when I had a family to cook for. . . . [Now] my daughter moans at me.” (Judith) 
 “Well, I suppose it [food] becomes much more mundane, doesn’t it? It becomes something you know you have to do because you have to eat.” (Barbara) 
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