This editorial, simultaneously published in the British Journal of Occupational Therapy (BJOT), the American Journal of Occupational Therapy (AJOT), and the Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy (CJOT), heralds a reciprocal agreement allowing an approximate readership of 80,000 members of the journals’ respective professional bodies to have free online access to each other’s journals. Online access is available by going to each association’s Web site and clicking on the links to the other associations’ journals. BJOT has had this beneficial arrangement in place with the Australian Occupational Therapy Journal (AOTJ) since 2011 (Froude & Craik, 2010). Although each journal publishes international peer-reviewed articles, each journal has its own vision.

AJOT, which commenced publication in 1947, publishes 6 issues a year and has an annual supplement featuring the American Occupational Therapy Association’s official documents. The journal focuses on research examining the effectiveness and efficiency of occupational therapy practice. In addition, the journal aims to publish research documenting the reliability and validity of occupational therapy instruments; studies demonstrating a relationship between occupational engagement and the facilitation of community participation and health; and articles that provide a forum for scholars to debate professional issues that affect education, practice, and research. Online issues are available from 1980. Recent special issues focus on sensory processing and sensory integration, effectiveness of mental health practice, older driver and community mobility, traumatic brain injury/stroke, and productive aging.

CJOT, which began publication in 1933, publishes 5 times a year. The journal fosters advancement and growth of research, theory, and practice in occupational therapy. The mission of the journal is to advance excellence in occupational therapy research that informs education, practice, and policy. CJOT also publishes full-length articles and brief reports. Online issues are available from 1974 and shortly will be available all the way back to 1933. Recent special issues cover driving and community mobility, influencing policy, and the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (World Health Organization, 2001). CJOT is excited to be in partnership with BJOT (2008), AOTJ (2011), New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy (2009) and, now, AJOT.

BJOT, which commenced as the Journal of the Occupational Therapists’ Association in 1938, publishes 12 times a year. Its purpose is to publish articles relevant to theory, practice, research, education, and management in occupational therapy internationally. The journal has delivered peer-reviewed international research and practice-related articles that contribute to the knowledge and evidence base of occupational therapy and encourage scholarly discussion and debate. Online issues are available from 1998, and plans are in place to digitize all back issues. Recent special issues include promoting physical activity to enhance quality of life and the Model of Human Occupation. Forthcoming special issues will include participation in occupations across the life course and occupational performance measures for health and well-being.

In bringing together the strengths of each of these rich resources, we can support the profession’s international development through disseminating research; building robust theories; and sharing innovative approaches to research, education, management, and practice. We encourage members of all three associations to cite each other’s research. Increased citation of occupational therapy research will increase the impact score of all three journals and promote occupational therapy’s recognition as a valid and valued health care profession.

We hope that members will maximize these extended opportunities for both accessing a wider range of publications and broadening interest in areas of professional development and research.

References

Froude
,
E.
, &
Craik
,
C.
(
2010
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Facilitating access to evidence—A benefit to the profession
.
British Journal of Occupational Therapy
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73
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569
. 10.4276/030802210X12918167234082.
World Health Organization.
(
2001
).
International classification of functioning, disability and health
.
Geneva
:
Author
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