Abstract

Importance: As the use of simulation in occupational therapy education continues to increase, so too does the need for continued research on its impact on clinical practice performance and the value of simulation as a pedagogic method.

Objective: To develop a survey to measure the perceived impact of high-fidelity, high-technology simulation experiences during occupational therapy education on occupational therapists’ performance and to describe occupational therapists’ perceptions of the impact of simulation on clinical skills.

Design: Cross-sectional descriptive study.

Setting: Online survey administration.

Participants: Occupational therapists completed an online survey to measure their perceptions of the impact of high-fidelity, high-technology simulation experiences on essential skills in four performance domains: confidence, knowledge, clinical skills, and patient safety skills.

Results: Sixty-seven occupational therapists perceived participation in simulation experiences during occupational therapy education had more impact on transferring clients and using safe body mechanics than on communicating with clients, assessing vital signs, or applying clinical reasoning. The survey items had evidence of content validity, and scores showed good internal consistency reliability.

Conclusions: Survey results suggested high-fidelity, high-technology simulation during occupational therapy education may affect clinical practice performance. Additional research is needed to determine the effectiveness of simulation education in preparing occupational therapists for clinical practice.

What This Article Adds: The survey developed in this study is a reliable measure of the impact of simulation experiences on clinical practice performance of occupational therapists.

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