Abstract

Importance: The Occupational Self-Assessment, Version 2.2 (OSA 2.2), is a client-centered measure of clients’ perceived occupational competence and value. The OSA 2.2 has previously demonstrated good structural validity and internal consistency; however, the administration length could deter therapists from using this assessment in acute care and acute inpatient rehabilitation.

Objective: To evaluate reliability and validity of the OSA 2.2 in acute care and acute inpatient rehabilitation and to develop and validate the OSA–Short Form (OSA–SF).

Design: We performed a descriptive psychometric analysis using the Rasch analytic approach.

Setting: The data were collected in acute care and acute inpatient rehabilitation.

Participants: Our convenience sample consisted of 86 patients in acute care and acute inpatient rehabilitation.

Outcomes and Measures: Participants rated their perceived occupational competence and value by completing the OSA 2.2.

Results: We examined psychometric properties of the OSA 2.2 and OSA–SF using a partial credit Rasch model. The 21-item OSA 2.2 was reduced to a 12-item OSA–SF through iterative removal of items on the basis of item-misfit statistics. The OSA–SF demonstrated adequate rating scale functioning, dimensionality, item and person goodness of fit, item targeting, item hierarchies, and item and person separation.

Conclusions and Relevance: Findings indicate that the OSA–SF is a valid and reliable measure that can guide client-centered goal setting and intervention planning for adults receiving acute care and acute inpatient rehabilitation.

What This Article Adds: The OSA 2.2 and the OSA–SF offer a client-centered approach to evaluating patients’ self-reported ability and ratings of the importance of performing everyday occupations. These assessments can guide client-centered goal setting in acute care and acute inpatient rehabilitation.

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