Abstract

OBJECTIVES. This study examined the relationship between awareness of disability and occupational performance in a group of elderly persons during the year after stroke.

METHOD. Data on awareness of disability and occupational performance (i.e., activities of daily living [ADL] motor and process ability) were collected 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after stroke. A mixed-linear-effects model was implemented to examine the relationship between awareness of disability and ADL motor and process ability over time.

RESULTS. Increased awareness of disability was related to improvements in occupational performance (ADL motor and process ability). The 2 relationships were different, with a positive linear relationship between awareness of disability and ADL motor ability, and a stronger, positive, nonlinear relationship between awareness of disability and ADL process ability.

CONCLUSION. Clients’ awareness of disability and their ability to perform occupations should be assessed several times during a rehabilitation process so that interventions can be adjusted to match each client's potential to benefit from them.

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