Abstract

Occupational therapy private practice appears to play a major role in the provision of rehabilitation services in skilled nursing facilities. A critical look at the meaning of private practice, however, indicates that many of today’s private practitioners lack characteristics traditionally associated with that term. Group private practices are well suited to retain the essential qualities of private practice while competing effectively in a corporate environment. They accomplish this difficult task by applying therapeutic principles of growth and change to the complex relationship between the group practice and the skilled nursing facility. Application of these principles allows the occupational therapy group private practice to behave consistently with its professional identity while addressing the competitive demands of the marketplace.

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